Shannon Stacey

New York Times bestselling author of contemporary romance & more

504 notes &

helenkaydimon:

stripping/stripped Steve, in the presence of Danny.

AKA The Smooth Dog Seduction Technique isn’t at all subtle.

Him doing this is pretty much the only reason to watch Hawaii 5-0

Oh, hello…

(Source: ignem-feram)

3 notes &

I’ve seen it reported that the guns used in yesterday’s school shooting were “secured”, but the shooter got around it. It’s a tragic but important reminder that children get into EVERYTHING. There was no safe place to hide Christmas presents. And there’s no safe place for guns.
If I pressed my sons, I bet they’d admit they know the combination to the gun safe, or at least have a good guess. They could certainly dig deeply enough through the house to find the back-up key that comes with the safe in case something happens with the electronic lock.
Gun safes are a defense against burglars. That’s their primary function. They offer a small amount of protection against fire. They’ll keep very young children from having access to the weapons. But a middle or high schooler would probably need less than a half-hour alone in a house to gain access to the safe.
My husband and I have talked about this in the past and we’ve agreed that if either of us ever gets nervous about how one of our kids is doing emotionally, especially with regard to school, the guns will be packed off to a friend’s home indefinitely. No debate, no vote. A parental executive decision the other parent can’t veto.
Nobody knows a child like his or her parents. If you’re afraid your child is being bullied at school or your child seems to be withdrawn or his or her behavior just worries you, please ask a friend to take your guns for a while. It’s not silly. It’s not overreacting. There is no shame in it.
And even if it is overreacting? With 74 school shootings in the 77 weeks since Sandy Hook, maybe it’s time to err on the side of overreaction.

I’ve seen it reported that the guns used in yesterday’s school shooting were “secured”, but the shooter got around it. It’s a tragic but important reminder that children get into EVERYTHING. There was no safe place to hide Christmas presents. And there’s no safe place for guns.

If I pressed my sons, I bet they’d admit they know the combination to the gun safe, or at least have a good guess. They could certainly dig deeply enough through the house to find the back-up key that comes with the safe in case something happens with the electronic lock.

Gun safes are a defense against burglars. That’s their primary function. They offer a small amount of protection against fire. They’ll keep very young children from having access to the weapons. But a middle or high schooler would probably need less than a half-hour alone in a house to gain access to the safe.

My husband and I have talked about this in the past and we’ve agreed that if either of us ever gets nervous about how one of our kids is doing emotionally, especially with regard to school, the guns will be packed off to a friend’s home indefinitely. No debate, no vote. A parental executive decision the other parent can’t veto.

Nobody knows a child like his or her parents. If you’re afraid your child is being bullied at school or your child seems to be withdrawn or his or her behavior just worries you, please ask a friend to take your guns for a while. It’s not silly. It’s not overreacting. There is no shame in it.

And even if it is overreacting? With 74 school shootings in the 77 weeks since Sandy Hook, maybe it’s time to err on the side of overreaction.